Semester : Spring 2013

Welcome to Sociology 101. Sociology studies so many different things: music, sports, culture, you name it. This semester we are going to focus on the Sociology of Guns. Why ? Well, because of the Newtown tragedy. We need to  take a close look at guns – the culture of guns, the research on guns, the Second Amendment, etc. Our primary text is “Living With Guns.” Each week we will have an assignment from  it  as well as from the textbook.  Since homeworks will count for 45 percent of your final grade, you will need to come to class having done the homeworks in order to pass this class. And coming to class prepared will make for a valuable experience for everyone. Let’s all have a good semester.

Texts: Sociology a Brief introduction 9th ed. Schaefer;  Living with Guns by Craig Whitney; The Pearl IS AVAILABLE FREE ONLINE AT THIS WEB ADDRESS: http://www.scribd.com/doc/8703693/The-Pearl-John-Steinbeck

Instructor: Tom Celandine 609 343 4947; email – celandin@atlantic.edu. Note the last “e” is dropped from my college email address.

Office hours: Tues. 11: 30 – 12: 30; Wed. 1 – 2; Thurs. 11:30 – 12:30.  Office B142. I urge you to make office appointments to discuss your progress. Additional office hours can be made available.

HOMEWORKS: Log onto Blackboard each week to see your homework assignment. You need to complete these assignments in order to pass the course. Homeworks are worth 45percent of your final grade. You need to come to class with a hard copy when the assignment is due. They must be handed in on time. They may also be rewritten for a higher grade within a week. The assignments may also be seen by going to atlantic.edu/celandine. Assignments not turned in will be graded “F.” 

OVERALL GRADES: Homeworks worth 45 percent of final grade; You can NOT  pass this course without doing these assignments. Tests worth 50 percent; paper worth 5 percent. Homeworks not turned in on time will be graded “F.”

B. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This introductory course is designed to introduce students to the primary concepts, terminology, and methods of investigation used in sociology. Sociology studies how we define our social world, create and learn rules for interacting with one another, establish and maintain institutions such as the family, school, and church, divide and distribute wealth among ourselves, struggle for power and prestige, and adjust to new ideas and technologies. This course introduces students to the conceptual tools needed to explore these issues and to develop a critical understanding of the social world.  Meets general education sociology requirement for A.A. degrees and social science requirement for A.A.S. and A.S. degrees.

C. Prerequisite: None

 

D. LEARNING GOALS: Students will both learn about, and also learn to integrate, a sociological perspective in thinking about society, culture, and social behavior. Students will understand the methods of social science and of sociology in particular. Students will understand major sociological perspectives and sociological theories and apply them to social institutions and social behavior. Students will recognize, understand, and respect the importance of diversity based on culture, race, gender, sexuality, class, age, and disability.

 

E. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: 

Students will be able to:

  • Apply critical thinking skills to analyze concepts and theories;
  • Formulate comprehensive arguments and engage in constructive discussion;
  • Develop their professional and academic writing skills;
  • Develop an awareness of diverse social issues from around the world;
  • Recognize themselves in the social world and understand the importance of their role within it

 

 

F. LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

 

CHAPTER 1: Understanding Sociology

  • Students will be able to recognize what sociology is and how it is defined.
  •                                Students will be able to explain how sociology applies to everyday life.
  •                                  Students will be able to explain the concept of the sociological imagination.
  •                                  Students will be able to explain Durkheim’s theory on suicide.
  •                                  Students will be able  to compare and contrast an analysis of sociology using the            symbolic interactionism, conflict theory and structural functionalism paradigms.
  •                                  Students will be able to explain the contributions of European and American founders               of sociology.
  •                                  Students will be able to demonstrate how community learning relates to a better         understanding of our society.

CHAPTER 2: Sociological Research

  •                                  Students will be able to recognize the ethical issues associated with sociological            research.
  •                                  Students will be able to  explain the difference between reliability and validity.
  •                                  Students will be able to identify the different research methods and the strengths and               weaknesses of each.
  •                                 Students will be able to explain Weber’s concept of verstehen and how it applies to      research.
  •                                 Students will be able to recognize and understand the six steps of social research or     scientific method.
  •                                 Students will be able to describe the differences between participant observation, case             studies, ethnography and secondary data analysis.
  •                                  Students will be able to identify and give an example of the different types of sampling            procedures.
  •                                Students will be able explain why triangulation is important in sociological research.
  •                                  Students will be able to demonstrate the procedures of quantitative and qualitative    research.
  •                                  Students will be able to explain how working on social policies and participating in       community-learning projects are ways sociologists can better the community.

 

CHAPTER 3: Culture

  •                               

Students will be able to identify elements of culture and to be able to provide examples of each.

  •                                  Students will be able recognize the difference between nonmaterial and material culture.
  •                                  Students will be able to identify major U.S. values as outlined by various sociologists.
  •                                  Students will be able to differentiate between ethnocentrism and cultural relativism.
  •                                 Students will be able to explain how subcultures and countercultures contribute to cultural    diversity.
  •                                  Students will be able to explain the difference between real culture and ideal culture.
  •                                 Students will be able to able to compare and contrast an analysis of culture using the               sociological theories of symbolic interactionism, conflict theory, and structural functionalism .
  •                                 Students will be able to identify how multiculturalism and assimilation relate to social ?policy.
  •                                * Students will understand the concept of dominant ideiology.

 

Chapter 4: Socialization and the Life Course

 

  • Students will be able to define the concepts of socialization and agents of socialization and provide an example of socialization that might be carried out for each agent of socialization.
  • Students will be able to explain the effects of being raised in social isolation and the evidence that these effects take place.
  • Students will be able to explain and illustrate the major sociological theories of socialization proposed by Charles Horton Cooley, George Herbert Mead, and Erving Goffman including the concepts that they introduced.  
  • Students will be able to enumerate the factors that make for a total institution and explain and illustrate the steps of rapid resocialization that generally occurs within such a setting.

 

Chapter 5: Social Interaction, Groups, Social Structure

 

  • Students will be able to explain the concept of concept of social structure as it applies to groups and societies and illustrate how people are positioned and enact their positions within social structures using the concepts of status, ascribed status, achieved status, master status, role, role conflict, and role exit.
  • Students will be able to explain how society’s social structures have historically changed by employing the frameworks of Mechanical Solidarity versus Organic Solidarity, Gemeinschaft versus Gesellschaft, and the Theory of Sociocultural Evolution.
  • Students will be able to define and illustrate the five characteristics of Max Weber’s ideal type bureaucracy and the types of dysfunctions that occur in bureaucracies including those that arise from alienation, trained incapacity, the Peter Principle, and the iron law of oligarchy.
  • Students will be able to explain what constitutes a group and how the concepts of primary versus secondary groups, ingroups versus outgroups, and reference groups can be applied when analyzing groups.
  • Students will be able to explain the importance of social networks in people’s social lives. 

 

 

Chapter 6: The Mass Media

  • Students will be able to explain and apply the theoretical l perspectives on media.
  • Students will be able to define and give examples of the following terms: narcotizing effect;  gatekeeping; digital divide; dominant ideology.
  • Students will be able to recognize, discuss and assess current forms of media such as facebook; tweets, etc.

 

 

Chapter 7: Deviance and Social Control

  • Students will be able to describe formal and informal systems of social control.
  • Students will be able to apply theories of deviance to explanations of conforming and non-conforming behavior
  • Students will be able to explain the mechanisms of defining deviant behavior and the effects that being labeled deviant have on groups of people.
  • Students will be able to explain the lessons associated with the Stanford Prison Experiment.

 

Chapter 8: Stratification and Social Mobility in the United States

  • Students will be able to describe the role of social inequality in the construction of social stratification.
  • Students will be able to describe major systems of stratification, including caste, class and estate and slavery.
  • Students will be able to explain the role of power in the construction and maintenance of systems of social stratification.
  • Students will be able to explain the ways that one’s membership in a social strata impacts social mobility.
  • Students’ will be able to explain Marx and Weber’s views

 

Chapter 9: Global Inequality

  • Students will be able to describe the process of globalization within a framework of worldwide stratification of nations, including economic, cultural, and political systems.
  • Students will be able to explain the roles of government and multinational corporations in the formation and maintenance of global relationships.
  • Students will be able to apply theories of global stratification to the changing relationships between nations.
  • Students will be able to explain the role of modern technology in globalization and global mobility.
  • Students will be able to discuss the development of universal human rights policy.

 

Chapter 10: Racial and Ethnic Inequality

  • Students will be able to distinguish between race and ethnicity and in doing so explain how and why race is a socially constructed identity as opposed to a biological one.
  • Students will be able to define and illustrate the concepts of stereotype, prejudice, discrimination, institutional discrimination and minority group.
  • Students will be able to explain at least two sociological theories and/or hypotheses for the existence of racism and the research basis that supports them and/or provides qualifications to them.
  • Students will be able to identify and define six patterns of intergroup relations and illustrate each by showing how they have applied historically to the relationships between racial and/or ethnic groups in the United States.

Chapter 11: Stratification by Gender

  • Students will be able to explain and apply the theoretical perspectives on gender stratification
  • Students will be able to explain and give examples of the terms :Women the Oppressed Majority.
  • Students will be able to explain and give examples of the following terms: gender roles; homophobia; sexism; institutional discrimination; glass ceiling; feminism.; second shift
  • Students will be able to distinguish between the concepts of sex and gender and explain the evidence that supports  social basis  for gender differences.
  • Students will be able to relate facts about the growth of womens’ participation in the workplace including differences in compensation between men and women and discuss the social implication of these changes.

Chapter 12:  The Family and Intimate Relationships

  • Students will be able to explain and apply the theoretical perspectives on the family.
  • Students will be able to explain and give examples of social class differences and racial and ethnic differences.
  • Students will be able to summarize and assess the text’s section on divorce and diverse lifestyles.

 

G. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES

 

Students Learning Outcome

Assessment Strategies

Apply critical thinking skills to analyze concepts and theories

 

Tests, Class discussions, small group discussion, written assignments and projects.

Formulate comprehensive arguments and engage in constructive discussion

 

Tests, Class discussions, small group discussion, written assignments and projects.

Develop their professional and academic writing skills

 

Tests, Written assignments, journals.

             Develop an awareness of diverse social issues from

             around the world

Tests, Class discussions, small group discussion, written assignments and projects.

            Recognize themselves in the social world and

            understand the importance of their role within it

 

Tests, Class discussions, small group discussion, written assignments, presentations, projects.

 

H. Test Schedule: Test 1 Week of  Feb. 12th : Chapters 1, 2, 3; “Living with Guns” chapters 1, 2 plus class work. Test 2 week of  March 12th Chapters 4, 6, 11, 12;  “Living With Guns” chapters 3,4, 5 plus class work . Test 3 week of  April 26th Chapters 5, pages 111 – 122; Chapters 7, 10 ; “Living With Guns”  chapters 6, 7, 8 plus class work; Final exam week of Dec. 18th Chapters 5 pages 108 – 110; 123 – 126; Chapters 8/9 plus “The Pearl”. Plus selected sections from earlier chapters to be explained later. Make-ups will be extremely difficult and come from textbook publisher.

I. Grading: Each of the first three exams is worth 10 percent of your final grade; the final exam is worth 20 percent; homework assignments are worth 45 percent and must turned in on time; 5 page paper worth 5 percent. This paper is about guns since we have been focusing  on them all term. Find two articles on gun control. One for strong control and one against more control.        A)Summarize each article.  B) Point out the strong and weak points in each. C) Conclude with your position and reasons for it. Attach both articles. Make sure you write this IN YOUR OWN WORDS. If you copy anything from another source you must cite it. If you don’t, you receive an F and lose 10 points off your final grade. Paper is to be 5 pages double spaced, 12 inch font, normal margins. Paper due week of April 30th. No late papers accepted.

 

 

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

  • Attend all classes, on time and for the duration of the course
  • Purchase textbook
  • Participate in discussions and group activities
  • Treat all class members and the instructor with respect
  • Complete all assignments according to requirements and on time

              * Class attendance is required.  Coming to class is necessary in order to achieve success in this course.  Every absence will impact upon your final grade.  Since we learn from each other, your absence affects not only you, but the other members of your class. More than 3 absences will result in failing.

J.Withdrawal Last date to withdaw is Friday MARCH 29th.

K. Grading Policy Each student is evaluated by instructors at the end of the semester. The following grades are used to indicate the caliber of the student’s academic achievement:

Grade

Grade Point Value

Definition

A 90 – 100

4.0

Superior

A-

3.7

B+ 86 – 89

3.3

B 80 – 85

3.0

Good

B-

2.7

C+ 76 - 79

2.3

C  70 - 75

2.0

Average

D  60 - 69

1.0

Passing

F (59 or lower

0.0

Failure

 

 


L. CLASSROOM RULES

Student Code of Conduct:  “On admission to ACCC, students accept a commitment to act in a responsible manner, which conforms to generally accepted standards of adult behavior.  Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the college’s code of conduct.  It is expected that all students will show courtesy and respect for each other and for administrative officers, faculty and employees… Students are expected to respect the property of the college and that of others.  Damage to or destruction of such property will be considered a matter for disciplinary action… Indiscriminate, obscene language shows lack of respect for self and others. Students should show courtesy and respect for themselves and others by refraining from this practice.”  See Student Code of Conduct in the Student Handbook (http://www.atlantic.edu/about/policy/208.html)

Disruptive behavior:  The use of foul language is prohibited.  Cell phone use in the classroom is prohibited; this includes texting.  Phones should be put in “vibrate” mode for emergency use only.  If you have to take a call, please excuse yourself from the classroom.

Any student who verbally or physically threatens the safety of other students, staff, faculty, or campus guests will be immediately suspended from the College pending a disciplinary hearing.  See “Student Code of Conduct Policy” in the Student Handbook (http://www.atlantic.edu/about/policy/208.html)

If a student becomes disruptive in the classroom, the instructor reserves the right to ask the student to leave or have them escorted off campus by Campus Security.

Sexual Harassment:  Sexual harassment in the classroom or in student-related activities is prohibited by the sex discrimination provisions of Title IX of the 1972 Education Amendment.  Sexual harassment has been defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct…  See Sexual Harassment and Affirmative Action in the Student Handbook (http://www.atlantic.edu/studentServ/documents/studentHandbook.pdf)

Accommodations:  Accommodations will be granted at the time that your Accommodation letter is presented to the instructor.  Any student who is eligible for accommodations for a documented disability should inform the instructor at the beginning of the semester.  If you choose not to share your need for accommodations or utilize your accommodations, please note that no prior considerations will be given for unsatisfactory coursework or attendance.  Contact Lucy McGlynn in Student Support Services at 343-5090 or lmcglynn@atlantic.edu for more information.

Confidentiality:  This course deals with self-discovery and self-exploration which can be very personal.  Since all students are encouraged to participate in discussions it is important that all students respect each other’s privacy.  All personal information shared in the classroom should remain in the classroom and not be discussed outside of the classroom. 

Emergency Plan:  If there is an emergency situation, your Instructor will tell you how to proceed. 

All students are encouraged to sign up for the college’s Text Alert program which will send a text message to your cell phone in the event of a campus emergency.  Signing up for ACCC TxtAlerts is Easy!  Go to:  http://www.atlantic.edu/about/txtMessage.html

Keys to College Success
Visit http://www.atlantic.edu/studentServ/counselAdvise/keysToSuccess.htm for some useful information on how to be successful in College!

Academic Honesty

ACCC expects unwavering integrity with submitted work from its students.  Acts of cheating or plagiarism will not be tolerated and may be subject to disciplinary action as detailed in the student handbook (http://www.atlantic.edu/studentServ/documents/studentHandbook.pdf) Students are expected to give credit to all individuals who contributed to the completion of any assignment.  Specific resources of all information, ideas and quotations not original to the author must be referenced. Not citing direct quotes results in an F grade for that assignment.

Classroom Rules  

All students are required to follow the rules which apply to classroom behavior as listed on the following website (http://www.atlantic.edu/about/policy/208.html)

Keys to College Success

Visit http://www.atlantic.edu/studentServ/counselAdvise/keysToSuccess.htm for some useful information on how to be successful in College!

Week 1 Introduction to sociology Chapter 1 “Understanding Sociology”

Week 2 Finish chapter 1; Chapter 2  “Research” and first chapter “Living With Guns.”

Week 3 Chapter 3 “Culture” and chapter 2 “Living With Guns.”

Week 4 Test 1 chapters 1, 2, 3; class notes; Chapters 1, 2 “Living With Guns.”

Week 5 Chapter 4 “Socialization” ; “Living With Guns” chapter 3.

Week 6 Chapters  6 “ Mass Media”; chapter 4 “Living With Guns.”

Week 7 Chapters 11 “Gender” ; 12 “Family”; “Living With Guns” chapter 5.

Week 8 Test 2 Chapters 4, 6, 11, 12; “Living With Guns” chapters 3, 4, 5.

Week 9 Parts of chapter 5; “Living With Guns” chapter 6.

Week 10 Chapter 7 “Deviance”; “Living With Guns” chapter 7.

Week 11 Chapter 10 “Race” ; “Living With Gun s” chapter 8

Week 12 Test 3 Chapters 5, 7, 10; chapter 8 “Living With Guns.”

Week 13 Paper due on “Living With Guns”; Parts of Chapter 5; Chapter 8 “Stratification”; Chapters  1, 2 “The Pearl.”

 

Week 14 Chapter 9 “Global Inequality”. Finish “The Pearl.”

Week 15 Review for Final Exam.