Keys to College Success

Students on campus

Classroom Etiquette

Student E-mail

The college communicates with students through the Buccaneer student email account. STUDENTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL INFORMATION SENT TO THEIR ACCOUNT. Visit http://start.buccaneer.atlantic.edu to access your email account. For questions contact Enrollment Services at  (609) 343-5005, or register@atlantic.edu.

Preparation for Class

  • You are expected to arrive to class on time and remain for the duration of the class.
  • If you know you are going to be late or have to leave early, inform the professor before class.
  • If you arrive late or have to leave early, do so as quietly as possible; do not disrupt the class (make sure you know the class policy for lateness and early departures).
  • Arrive to class prepared; with your textbook(s), and supplies for class, paper, pens, pencils, etc.
  • Do your homework and read ahead so you can actively participate in classroom discussions.

Disruptive Behavior

  • Students whose behavior makes teaching and learning difficult for others in the classroom is defined as disruptive behavior. Examples include: Being late, sleeping, talking, and making noise, texting, repeatedly interrupting, and passing notes.
  • Talking during class disrupts the learning environment.
  • If you don’t understand something, ask the professor, not your classmate.  There are probably other students who have the same question.
  • If you have an unrelated question for your classmate, ask after class; write it down if you are afraid you will forget.
  • Do not start rustling papers and books before the end of class. This behavior is rude, particularly when the professor is still speaking

Electronic Devices

  • All cell phones and other electronic devices should be turned off during class.  Phones should be put on vibrate   if there is an urgent situation pending.
  • Do not take phone calls during class time.
  • Do not wear head phones during class, even if your device is off.

Dress Code

  • Students are expected to dress appropriate for campus life.
  • Footwear and shirts are required inside all buildings and at all college functions.

Code of Conduct

  • The college has a zero tolerance policy for threatening and/or violent behavior. If this policy is violated you will be suspended immediately, pending a hearing.
  • You must behave in a responsible manner; showing respect towards others while on college property or attending college sponsored activities  (no profanity, no arguing, and absolutely no fighting). You will be suspended immediately if you verbally or physically threaten the safety of others.
  • You are expected to familiarize yourself with the college’s code  of conduct, which is in the Student Handbook and the college catalog.

Academic Honesty

  • Take pride in your work and do your own.
  • If you use another person’s idea or words it must be cited properly.
  • Plagiarism may result in an “F” grade for the assignment or for the course.
  • Two  offenses constitute grounds for Academic Dismissal.

Reading in Class

  • Give your undivided attention in each class.
  • Do not read newspapers or do homework for another class.
  • Professors notice rude behavior that may be reflected in any subjective portion of your grade.

Respect the Facilities

  • Respect college property and the property of  others. Damage or destruction of such property may result in disciplinary action.
  • Discard all trash after leaving each class. 

Academic Advising

Academic advisors are available to assist students with choosing major, selecting courses, monitoring progress towards academic goals, transfer assistance, etc.

Each semester students receive the list of faculty advisors through their Buccaneer Student Email account. If you are involved in a program in the Counseling and Support Services area (EOF, SSS, DSS, NJS), your counselor will assist you with academic advising.

Although most students can self-advise and register for courses on-line, it is strongly recommended that you meet with an academic advisor during your first year. Meeting with an advisor can help you make informed decisions in the future.

Advisors are very busy right before the beginning of a semester, so it is recommended that you make an appointment with an advisor once classes begin. This will allow you time to develop an academic plan that can be followed throughout your time at Atlantic Cape.

Your academic advisor may be a faculty member (preferred if you have identified a major), a counselor (if you are a participant in the Educational Opportunity Fund, Student Support Services, New Jersey Stars, and or Disability Support Services) or Student Development staff member (located in the Career and Advisement Center). If you are an on-line student and would like to work with an advisor on-line, you can do so by contacting Lynette Ingram at: lingram@atlantic.edu.

You can learn valuable information during advisement sessions that can save you time and money. Why not contact your advisor today? If you need assistance identifying an advisor, please contact Rose Conaghy at: (609) 343-5621 or conaghy@atlantic.edu.

Immunization

  • Proof of Immunization: Also in accordance with state law, new full-time students born since January 1, 1957 must submit a doctor's certificate of immunization for measles, mumps and rubella. Separate evidence must be submitted that a second immunization against measles has been administered in order to register for the next semester.

Academic Honesty

What is plagiarism?

According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, to “plagiarize” means:

  1. to steal and pass off the ideas or words of another as one’s own
  2. to use another’s production without crediting the source
  3. to commit literary theft
  4. to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.

Plagiarism is an act of fraud.  All of the following are considered plagiarism:

  • turning in someone else’s work as your own (using another student’s paper from the same or a different class)
  • copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit
  • failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
  • giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
  • changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
  • copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not

Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided by citing sources. Acknowledge that certain material has been borrowed and provide the information necessary to find the source.

Students often plagiarize intentionally or unintentionally due to poor planning.  They are rushed and turned to a classmate or the internet for quick “information” and/or “inspiration”. Plan to begin working on your assignments early to allow enough time to research and properly cite material.  

Plagiarism is a very serious offense and will not be tolerated.

Penalties for plagiarism vary from failing an assignment, and/or   failing a course to being dismissed from the college. All breaches of    academic dishonesty become part of your permanent record.

You can contact your professor or the Learning Assistance Center for additional information about how to properly cite material.

Success Tips

Tips for Success

  • You are responsible for your success or failure
  • You need to attend all classes and have regular study times to succeed
  • You need reliable transportation and childcare
  • You must maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA average to be in good academic standing
  • You will need lots of uninterrupted time for studying
  • You will need a quiet study place which is free from distractions
  • A full-time student (12 credits) will complete an associate’s degree in    2 ½ - 3 years

In the Classroom

  • If you arrive late to class, take the seat closest to you; do not disrupt class looking for your “regular” seat
  • You are expected to remain in the classroom for the duration of class; avoid leaving and re-entering except for emergencies
  • Go to all classes
  • Come prepared with pen, paper and textbook
  • Read the assignment ahead of time, prepare questions
  • Sit up front and pay attention
  • Treat the professor and the other students with respect
  • Ask questions. Participate in discussions
  • Ask the professor to clarify if you do not understand
  • Take notes
  • Get to know your professor and classmates
  • Get the professor’s help during office hours
  • Notify professor if unable to attend or if you are going to be late or need to leave early. Messages can be left at the Academic Division Office at (609) 343-5114
  • Get notes and assignments from your professor or classmates if you miss class

Note Taking

  • Take notes in outline form
  • Write concepts and main points, not word for word
  • Review notes after class
  • Write questions of things you don’t understand for the next class
  • Rewrite notes in your own words

When to Study

  • Schedule regular study periods
  • Use short blocks of time—2 hour blocks
  • Avoid marathon study sessions
  • Study when you are fresh.  Don’t study when you are tired
  • Take breaks to keep fresh
  • Set realistic goals of how much you can do at a time
  • Study hard material first when you are most alert

Time Management

  • Use planners, calendars to organize your time
  • Plan on 2-3 hours of study time for each hour of class
  • Plan time for your basic needs: Eating, sleeping, exercise, family/social time, and whatever else is important to you.
  • Plan time for the unexpected and emergencies
  • Learn to say NO
  • Decide on quiet hours with others in your household.
  • Don’t answer the phone when studying, use an answering machine.
  • Be aware of time wasters      

 Note Taking

  • Take notes in outline form
  • Write concepts and main points, not word for word
  • Review notes after class
  • Write questions of things you don’t understand for the next class
  • Rewrite notes in your own words

When to Study

  • Schedule regular study periods
  • Use short blocks of time—2 hour blocks
  • Avoid marathon study sessions
  • Study when you are fresh.  Don’t study when you are tired
  • Take breaks to keep fresh
  • Set realistic goals of how much you can do at a time
  • Study hard material first when you are most alert

Time Management

  • Use planners, calendars to organize your time
  • Plan on 2-3 hours of study time for each hour of class
  • Plan time for your basic needs: Eating, sleeping, exercise, family/social time, and whatever else is important to you.
  • Plan time for the unexpected and emergencies
  • Learn to say NO
  • Decide on quiet hours with others in your household.
  • Don’t answer the phone when studying, use an answering machine.
  • Be aware of time wasters      

Test Taking Strategies

Before the test

  • Know what material will be covered
  • Know what type of test it will be
  • Read and review all material
  • Know your formulas.  Have a formula card prepared, if allowed
  • Get a good night’s sleep
  • Have a good breakfast
  • Get to the test site early and get a good seat
  • Bring a watch, pencils, pens, and erasers
  • Avoid last minute studiers.  Avoid anxious people
  • Imagine you are with someone who believes in you
  • Say positive, soothing things to yourself

During the test

  • Be calm and believe in yourself
  • Skim the test.  Pace yourself
  • Read directions carefully
  • Do easy questions first.  Circle and go back to hard ones
  • Fill in the correct dot.  Put answers on practice and  answer sheet

After the test

  • Take a night off after the test and treat yourself
  • Much learning takes place when you get the test back. Pay attention to the questions you got wrong.  What was the professor looking for?  Why did the professor take points off?  What would be the ideal answer?  Learning from this test will prepare you for the next test.  You will learn how much detail the teacher wants on essays. You will find out if your teacher puts in trick questions or not.  You will get a better idea which parts to study for the next test.  If the professor does not go over your test, make an appointment to review your test with your teacher. This is an important step in your learning.

Multiple Choice Questions

Read the question. Cover the answers. Answer in your own words. Look at the answers. Which looks closest to your answer? If you don’t know, cross off answers you know are wrong. Cross out answers with always, never, must, every. Choose the best answer.

True-False

Read the question carefully.

Answer questions you know. If any part of the answer is false, the whole answer is false.

Words like: “all, always, every, only, none, never” are usually clues that the answer is false.

Words like: “some, usually, seldom, sometimes, probably, mainly, often, except, rarely” are often in true statements.

Short Answer

Begin the answer by rewriting a part of the question.  Question: What is the best method for preparing a pie crust?  Begin your answer:  The best method for preparing a pie crust is …..

Essay questions

Read the question. What is it asking you to do?  Brainstorm your ideas.  Organize your main ideas into an outline. Write a thesis statement. Begin each paragraph with a topic statement. Back up each idea.  Write a conclusion, summarizing your main points. Proofread for errors. Make sure your essay is neat and readable.

Additional Resources

Campus Resources